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-- for example, think about president reagan, he was running against the catastrophic effects of nixon's wage on price controls lasting up to 1980 and carter. the "new york times," i have to remind you, the "new york times" on the eve of the election between reagan and carter had it too close to call. lou: the third debate? >> that is right. lou: i know it's right. up next, governor romney trailing in the polls, but does history show come from behind wins are possible? as we disused, there -- discussed, there is history here. we'll have the report. are taxpayer dollars -- they call it art, but looks like obscenity to me, but there we are. we'll look at the ways in which the obama administration expresses religious sensitivity and tolerance and other ways in which had does not seem to give much of a damn. we'll talk about catth catholic league president, bill don hue and karen handle here in just moments. [ female announcer ] they can be enlightening. hey, bro. or engaging. conversations help us learn and grow. at wells fargo, we believe you can never underestimate the power of a conversation.
is just three days away. not the first debate ever. the first was 1960 with kennedy/nixon. mitt romney and barack obama will be live from denver. it is serious business, but there are also two games being played here. there's the expectations game the two campaigns have been playing. then there's the game of dodge ball. that's what we're talking about this morning. joining me now live is todd rogers. he's an assistant professor at harvard's kennedy school. thank you very much for joining us. >> hi, gary. thanks for having me. >> the artful dodge. what is that all about? >> so with a collaborator here at harvard, we've been doing psychological experiments to understand how its they politicians manage to evade questions without being detected so we've run a series of these experiments where viewers are randomly assigned to one of three conditions. in one condition they watch a video where a moderator asks a question that say as what will you do about the universal health care problem in the world. the politician said, i'll glad you asked me that. we need universal health care. we then sp
entertainment tv extravaganzas. they have since the 1960 kennedy/nixon debate. it became a televised event. richard nixon won if you listened on radio, but if you saw the body language on tv, it was kennedy who won. there was a period of time there were no presidential debates. 1964, '68, '72, none. but back in 1976 these debates came on again. they can be game changers. 1980, ronald reagan was where romney was, behind in the polls. reagan came on and took on an incumbent president, jim cia why ther, performed well in the debates and the rest is history. it started him on his way to a landslide victory in 1980. >> do you think debates actually help voters decide which person to back if they're on the fence as to which direction to go? >> i think they make a difference, particularly for mitt romney. look, barack obama, whether you love him or dislike him, think he's a great leader or think he's failed, we kind of know what he's going to be like as president. we've had him for 3 1/2 years. mitt romney is still an open book. people have to say, do i want to live with this guy every day? is he
's got to score. >> there was a time between the famous kennedy-nixon tapes that there were no televised debates. why are they considered so vital now? >> well, the kennedy-nixon debates created so much attention in 1960. many people think that's why ted kennedy won. if you recall ford made famously the gap that -- and then certainly by 1980, ronald reagan was very behind in the polls was just able to tidal wave over jimmy carter with quips like there you go again in a sort of staged format. since 1980, they have become part of the american landscape. >> the "new york times" recently wrote about this debate prep and the president of the united states is an awesome figure merely to share the platform with him on equal terms is the gain in stature, good performance will be gauged even better. why would any president agree to participate in an event that ultimately -- the -- because it's become now a demand, president obama suddenly bailed on debates. then, you know, he would be seeming like a poor sport. and also these debates are agreed upon long before the fall season, they're everything
that he gave while richard nixon continuously lost ground thereafter. the story goes that it was kennedy's tan, his youthful look that won him the first televised debate. do you think that's the full story? >> i think that's part of an lore. i think much more was this. before that first debate john kennedy was thought of as a young, not very distinguished absentee senator, junior senator from massachusetts debating against the vice-president of the united states who had stood up to kruschev. this marvelous debater. kennedy was able to not only match nixon but exceed him. people began to think of him as a possible president. >> are debates necessary for the democratic process? have the best debaters proven to be then the best presidents? >> they have in one sense. and that is one of the most important things you want from a president is someone who if he has to make a tough decision can go to americans and say, this may be unpopular with you but let me try to explain it, explain why it's the right thing to do. if a president doesn't have that he's not going to serve very well and the deba
. >> i play a lot of golf. >> nixon plays golf. >> i don't want to whine and complain, if i was romney in the first ten minutes, i would have -- bam. >> they get you here right here. >> is he a good dancer? >> he's gotten to be a better dancer. >> you really put your foot down. >> stop it. this is hard. you want to try it? get in the ring. >> oh my? was i a little strong? >> when you go after my man -- >> everyone is giving me high fives. >> do you think this would be going better if he had nominated someone else? >> and what's burning down here? >> if you don't man up you got to shut up. >> this is a guy that cares for the 100%. >> we use fairly right now so people don't get tired of her. >> let's get right to our panel now. we're joined by goldie taylor managing editor of the goldie taylor project, jimy williams and julian epstein. julian, if i might begin with you. we saw ann romney last night on with jay leno. she wondered if she had come off a little strong last week when she chastised all of us when we didn't realize how lucky we are for having her husba
out. >> i mean nixon and sparrow agnew perfected it in the '60s and '70s we're the pointy headed intellectuals and turned the notion of the elite being big business and those people that make the decisions those liberals who want to tell you how to live and where to send your children to school. >> you saw it with president obama where the first african-american president who has credentials, very much like every other president, ivy league education, all of that sort of thing, suddenly gets framed in this way that his intellectual accomplishments are inappropriate and instead what we saw was a kind of populism that emerged from the mccain and palin campaign in '08 to push back against that. we're seeing a renewal of that. >> mitt romney -- >> joint degrees from harvard. >> exactly. doesn't really match with this candidate but there's a way in which it emerges in '08. >> so used to using it. >> about the attacking academic credentials when you counted up in 2008 how often people's education was specifically cited in major newspaper articles, barack obama's time at harvard went ov
that have done that. one was the debate between nixon and kennedy. it was televised. kennedy came off as being much smoother, more likesable. that's an example of how high the stakes would have to be for there to be a real game-changer. i think what you're going to see more likely is viewers watching these debates in the aggregate. they're all very close together. and advisers are saying they're expecting the polls to get tighter as we get closer to election day barring any major misstep from either candidate. martin. >> nbc's krit tin welker, from politics to pugilism, you are there. thank you so much, kristin. >> reporter: thanks, martin. we'll be right back. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay
and debates have not been so decisive except when the races are very already tight, kennedy/nixon, gore/bush, but we may well see the narrative of a 1% romney which we've seen reinforcing the 47%. video and that -- and out of touch with not only his own being who he was, but with ordinary voters, average people in this country. >> i'm -- i'm eager to see how romney deals with follow-up questions. ryan's stuff the contention i don't have enough time, what i'm trying to basically tear apart the american social compact, you know, in some -- if you interpret it in one way but massively overhaul this nation's sort of tax plan, but i don't have time to get into the details, president obama's going to press him on this. >> well, right. well, one, you a situation where, you know, mitt romney apparently has all these memorized zingers that he's going to unleash on the president tomorrow, but then, what you don't hear folks talk about is, once the zinger has been thrown out there, then what? so he lays out and says energy independence, well when the follow-up question comes, what's the there ther
of golf. >> nixon plays golf. >> i don't want to whine and complain, if i was romney in the first ten minutes, i would have -- bam. >> they get you here, right here. >> is he a good dancer? >> he'sotten to be a better ncer. sitlly tourt this is hard. you want to try it? get in the ring. >> oh, my? was i a little strong? >> when you go aer my man -- >> everyone is giving me high fives. >>o you think this would be going betterf he had ninated somee el ahaur down here? >> if you don't man up, you got to shut up. >> this is a guy that cares for the 100%. >> we use fairly right now so people don't get tired of her. >> let's get right to our panel now. we're joined by goldie taylor, managing editor of the goldie taylor project, jimy williams and julian epstein. julian, i might begin with you. we saw ann romney last night on with jay leno. li sg st week when cof she chastised all of us when we didn't realize how lucky we are for having her husband run for president. what did you think of the more humble mrs. romney? >> i don't critique -- >> stop it. t heng get in the wring. >> she does ha
and lost all the way going back to nixon and kennedy. often, it was a really good one liner that summedded up someone or it was a good rebuttal, and often, it was a gaffe. neil: do you think they change the outcome, though? i mean, if you look back at 1980, you could argue the momentum was beginning to go in ronald reagan's favor. you can argue in 1960, though the race was tight, people were open to a challenger. you're smarter than i'll ever be, pat, but does it change the outcome or confirm a trend? >> i think the 1980 debate did not change the outcome, but i think it -- reagan won. he was moving ahead. i think that's why carter wanted to debate, but that gave him a 10-point victory. i think that the
in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between nixon and mcgovern. on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kiss jer made a surprise declaration. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> it was the fird so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win reelection for nixon 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election. despite president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated. setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan emissaries back channeled with ryan to delay freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> fast forward to 1992, president jhw bush was on the ropes a
i explored it i assumed that kennedy had beaten nixon decisively but it only moved the poll as couple of spots but it allowed kennedy to prove that he could be president, to pass the threshold. acceptability in stature. same thing with jimmy carter. carter would not have been president without debates and kennedy said he wouldn't have been. sometimes it works at wary. generally, and, reagan, one debate, it was decisive, with one debate in 1980 and the last week of the campaign, because it allowed reagan to prove he wasn't dangerous. for romney the debate is all about being able to prove if my opinion several things, but most importantly, that he is not a bad person. he has 90 minutes, the obama campaign has spent several million defining him in a way that he murders people, that he is grossly for the rich. >> what does romney have to do? >> he needs to articulate a plan as to what he will do to change america. pat is right, he has to make himself accessible to the american people. beyond that, unless people get a sense that he has a clear at stiff vision for the country and
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)